Russian (RUSS)

RUSS 101 —  Elementary Russian 1 Course count: 1 

Promotes active communicative skills along with the basics of Russian grammar. By course end, read, write, understand, and speak Russian in a broad range of everyday situations. Various aspects of Russian culture and life are introduced through the medium of language. Five class hours weekly and language lab practice. One and one-quarter units each semester.

Students who have taken any higher level RUSS course may not earn credit for RUSS 101. No previous knowledge of language.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

RUSS 102 —  Elementary Russian 2 Course count: 1 

Promotes active communicative skills along with the basics of Russian grammar. By course end, read, write, understand, and speak Russian in a broad range of everyday situations. Various aspects of Russian culture and life are introduced through the medium of language. Five class hours weekly and language lab practice. One and one-quarter units each semester.

Recommended prerequisite: RUSS 101 or equivalent. Students who have taken any higher level RUSS course may not earn credit for RUSS 102.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

RUSS 201 —  Intermediate Russian 1 Course count: 1 

Designed to activate students' spoken Russian, a wide variety of in-class activities allow students to practice Russian needed for most everyday situations. Textbook and workbook are supplemented with audio and videotapes. Conducted in Russian.

Recommended prerequisite: RUSS 102 or equivalent. Students who have taken any higher level RUSS course may not earn credit for RUSS 201.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

RUSS 202 —  Intermediate Russian 2: Language In Action Course count: 1 

Designed to activate students' spoken Russian, a wide variety of in-class activities allow students to practice Russian needed for most everyday situations. Textbook and workbook are supplemented with audio and videotapes. Conducted in Russian.

Recommended prerequisite: RUSS 201 or equivalent. Students who have taken any higher level RUSS course may not earn credit for RUSS 202.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

RUSS 251 —  Tales of Desire Course count: 1 

This course treats the representation of desire in great works of the Western literary tradition. We will examine the transformation of this great literary theme over the ages and in various literary genres. The readings will include Euripide's Hyppolitus, Dante's La Vita Nuova, The Don Juan stories of Tirso de Molina, Bryon and Pushkin, Falubert's Madame Bovary, Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Nabokov's Lolita. Conducted in English. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Literature

RUSS 253 —  Fire & Ice: Siberia In Fiction Course count: 1 

A consideration of Siberia as a native land, an adopted land, and a land of exile. Students start with Siberian folktales and the study of such native traditions as shamanism. Next, the course examines Siberia through Chekhov, Dostoevsky, and Shalamov as a land of both freedom and imprisonment. Finally, students read Rasputin, Astafiev, and Shukshin, whose work is devoted to the preservation of Siberia as a natural world and a culture. Narrative and documentary films complement the reading selections. Conducted in English. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Literature

RUSS 257 —  Russian Drama and the West Course count: 1 

Read Shakespeare, Moliere, Goldoni, and Ibsen and analyze their influence on such Russian playwrights as Pushkin, Gogol, Chekhov, Blok, Evreinov, and others. Special attention will be paid to Stanislavky's acting system - a Hollywood favorite - and Meyerhold's experimentation on the Russian modern stage. Conducted in English. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Literature

RUSS 258 —  Russian Cinema Course count: 1 

This course examines the development of Russian cinema from its silent pre-Revolutionary stage up to the Post-Soviet blockbusters. It focuses on the artistic and technical achievements of Russian filmmaking and their contribution to practical and theoretical aspects of western cinema. We will discuss the distinction between Russian cinema as an ideological tool of a totalitarian state, and western cinema as an entertainment industry. Screenings will include a variety of cinematic genres and styles such as Eisenstein's legendary The Battleship Potemkin (1925) and the Oscar-winning films Moscow Does not Believe in Tears (1979) and Burnt by the Sun (1994). Conducted in English.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Arts, Cross-Cultural Studies

RUSS 259 —  Fairytale: Russia & the World Course count: 1 

This course explores the ritual origins and subsequent uses and functions of the folk, literary, and contemporary fairytale. Its methods include anthropological, psychological, archetypal, structural, feminist, and spiritual readings of the world¿s most important tales. The course is both theoretical and practical. It aims not only to help students understand the various functions and methods of treating fairytale, but also to give them the tools to work with the genre themselves. The course also discusses historical problems of the study and classification of the fairytale. The cross-cultural approach of the course is designed to familiarize students with non-Western tales that challenge their assumptions about cultural boundaries and question the notion of what it means to be civilized. Conducted in English. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Literature

RUSS 260 —  19Th Century Russian Literature Course count: 1 

This course considers the "Rabbles, Rebels, and Martyrs" of Russia's Golden Age of literature. During the 19th century, the Emancipation of the serfs, the Great Reforms, revolutionary activity and continued westernization changed Russian society dramatically. Perhaps it was these attempts at liberalization that produced the great works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy. Read the classic works of Russia's Golden Age: The Bronze Horseman, Hero of Our Time, The Overcoat, Crime and Punishment and Anna Karenina. Conducted in English. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

RUSS 261 —  20Th/21st Century Russian Literature Course count: 1 

A survey of the major works, authors and movements of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will discuss the function of literature in the Russian society over the last one hundred years, from the modernist pre-revolutionary era to the present. We will focus on novels, short stories and poetry written during the Bolshevik Revolution and Civil War, Stalinism, the era of stagnation, and after the fall of communism. The reading will include such diverse writers as Checkhov, Blok, Zamyatin, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Akhmatova, Pastemak, Solzhenitsyn, Pelevin and others. Conducted in English. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature, Literature

RUSS 263 —  Soviet Art and Literature Course count: 1 

In addition to pure propaganda, the Soviet doctrine of Socialist Realism also produced a rich tradition of art and literature that expressed the ideal of the New Soviet Person. While introducing students to the wealth of Socialist Realist art and ways to interpret its hidden meanings and messages, this course traces the evolution of the positive hero in Soviet literature and art. We consider the meaning of Socialist Realism as a way to practice and understand art. We also discuss the merits and the dangers inherent in the relationship between this kind of literature and Soviet society, one that allowed a nation on its knees to rebuild and modernize as well as one that silenced countless authors. Students are also asked to discern how, in satirical or subversive works, the tenets of Socialist Realism are subverted and their values questioned and why, in todays Russia, there is a growing nostalgia (and market) for Socialist Realist art. Conducted in English. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Arts, Literature

RUSS 264 —  Writing Under Stalin Course count: 1 

This course examines major literary works of the Stalinist era as the artistic expression of the history of twentieth century art, its writers and poets, and their relationship to the Soviet dictator, Joseph Stalin. The course teaches students how to discern symbolic systems that encode the works, often as a form of protest. It also considers the ethical issues at the heart of the works that concern such resistance and it risks and the role that art plays in such discussions. This course presents the social, political and cultural history of the Stalin-era Soviet Union (1922-1953) through primary and secondary historical sources, literature, arts, film (documentary and interpretive), and music. It attempts to piece together the history of stalinism, while asking students to consider the moral complexities of the time and it relevance to Russia as well as to other modern day nations. Students grapple with multiple voices that compete to own the history of Stalin, including that of Stalin himself. Conducted in English. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

RUSS 265 —  Roots of Russia Course count: 1 

This course explores Russias medieval roots from the tenth century to the death of Ivan the Terrible as it is represented by Russia itself  through both its history and its art. We read selections from the Primary Chronicles, lives of saints and holy fools, icon narratives, and Russias great epics. We will give great consideration to the important historical, political and spiritual role of the Russian icon. We also consider how the medieval age is represented in Russian opera and films such as Andrei Rublev, Mongol and 1612. Finally, we consider how modern writers, artists, and leaders  including Stalin and Putin  as well as contemporary Russian advertisements use medieval imagery for their own purposes.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Arts, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

RUSS 301 —  Russian Composition & Conversation Course count: 1 

Continued development of oral and written language skills and cultural competency through the use of Russian literature, film, songs, and art.

Prerequisite: RUSS 202 or equivalent

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Language Studies

RUSS 303 —  Adv Studies in Russian Culture Course count: 1 

An analysis of literary works and documentary material with the aim of probing Russian cultural traditions of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. All discussions, readings and course work in Russian. One unit.

Prerequisite: RUSS 301 or equivalent.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Language Studies

RUSS 392 —  Advanced Russian Tutorial Course count: 1 

This is a mixed-level course appropriate for students with advanced Russian language abilities from coursework, study abroad or native heritage. The course approaches a chosen theme from various media and focuses on both oral and written literacy. Student interest determines the theme(s) of study and the course is then titled accordingly. This course may be taken more than once.

Prerequisite: RUSS 301 or equivalent

GPA units: 1

RUSS 491 —  Tutorial Course count: 1 

GPA units: 1

RUSS 492 —  Tutorial Course count: 1 

GPA units: 1