International Studies (INST)

AFST 260 —  Black Europe Course count: 1 

Although often considered homogenously white, Europes population is and always has been racially diverse. This diversity is the culmination of centuries of colonialist interventions around the globe, particularly in Africa and the West Indies. This course will explore the history and contemporary reality of this population diversity, with a particular focus on the African diaspora in Europe. Beginning with Europes simultaneous expulsion of Jews and Muslims and discovery of Caribbean islands in 1492, the students will trace Europes colonial history in Africa and the West Indies that ultimately resulted in return migration of current and former African colonial subjects to multiple metropoles in Europe. Students will then focus on the experiences of the African Diaspora in Europe, broadly, and in five countries (Britain, France, The Netherlands, Germany, and Italy) before addressing contemporary debates (the racialization of Muslims as the new Blacks in Europe, citizenship laws within and across the EU, and anti-racist movements) and concluding with discussion of the future of race and Africans in Europe.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ANTH 101 —  Anthropological Perspective Course count: 1 

A one-semester introduction to the main modes of cultural anthropological analysis of non-Western cultures, such as those of Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia, Melanesia, Polynesia, sub-Saharan Africa and Native America. Topics include: ethnographic methods; concepts of culture; symbolic communication; ecological processes; introduction to anthropological approaches to kinship, religion, gender, hierarchy, economics, medicine, political life, transnational processes.

Enrollment limited to 1st and 2nd year students only

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 170 —  Contemporary Asia Course count: 1 

This course examines contemporary Asia as an interconnected region that influences world events and as diverse societies, cultures, and nation states that face particular problems as they struggle with issues of globalization, modernity, and neoliberalism while trying to maintain a sense of national or cultural identity. Readings focus on India, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Japan, China, Hong Kong, Philippines, and the Asian diaspora. Topics include religion, aging, family, gender, politics, economics, class, labor migration, consumerism, ethnicity, and Orientalism.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ANTH 251 —  Informal Economies Course count: 1 

The UN reports that 2/3 of the global workforce operates in the "informal economy." This course develops an anthropological approach to that fact. Our foundation is the literature on the informal economy in Africa and other parts of the global south, but we will also explore economic processes closer to home. Topics include: the origin, development, and use of the "informal economy" concept, precarious livelihoods, micro-credit and "bottom of the pyramid" ventures, informal networks, illicit trade, smuggling, black markets, and organized crime.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

ANTH 253 —  Gender & Development Course count: 1 

Is there any validity to the claim that women in the Global South have largely been "left out", "marginalized" and even "harmed" by development programs and ideologies? And is development a new form of imperialism? The course begins with discussion of anthropological and feminist critiques of "development" and then examines successes and shortfalls of different strategies used to "bring women back" into development. We then evaluate the gendered impacts of development policies, programs promoted by international development agencies.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

ANTH 266 —  Cultures and Politics of Latin America Course count: 1 

An introduction to the cultures, politics and history of Latin America. The course examines past and current issues of the region through ethnographic monographs as well as through a cross-disciplinary approach that includes historical analysis, excerpts from literature, and film. Units focus on: pre-Colombian empires and conquest; the Zapatista revolution against neoliberalism in Mexico; militarization and Maoist rebels Shining Path in Peru; transvestites and Pentecostals in Brazil; drug wars, dirty wars and debates over reconciliation and reparations in Guatemala; labor movements in Argentina; and indigenous and womens social movements that cross national boundaries.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ANTH 268 —  Economic Anthropology Course count: 1 

An introduction to the issues, methods, and concepts of economic anthropology. This course places economic features such as markets, commodities, and money into a larger cross-cultural context by exploring relations of power, kinship, gender, exchange, and social transformation.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ANTH 269 —  Fashion & Consumption Course count: 1 

A comparative, cultural anthropological exploration of fashion and consumption as tools for the creation, expression, and contestation of social, cultural, economic, political and individual identities. Topics include: anthropological and semiotic theories of materialism and consumption, subcultural styles, colonialism, race, gender, religious dress, globalization and ethnic chic.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ANTH 273 —  Anthropology of Africa Course count: 1 

This course provides an introductory anthropological account of 20th- and 21st-century Africa. The central theme is the "representation" of Africa and Africans, including the manner in which outsiders have portrayed the continent and its peoples in the past, African responses and rejoinders, and current scholarship and forms of self-representation. We will cover a number of broader themes, including music, race, art, ethnicity, youth, economic activity, "tradition" and "modernity," and the politics of cultural translation.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

CISS 250 —  Intro to Global Health Course count: 1 

It is recognized that poverty plays a central role in many preventable diseases. With the development of nations have come improvements in health. The linkages between health and development can only be understood within the broader context of socio-political and economic factors. In the landscape of globalization and international development there has emerged a vast international health regime. This course focuses on these linkages in the context of this international political economy of health. Key aspects are critically examined including the concepts and architecture of global health, the global burden and epidemiology of disease, health and development of nations, and political-economic determinants of health and development. This foundational course in global health will use a variety of analytical perspectives including political, legal, economic and epidemiological. The course focuses on developing countries. One unit.

GPA units: 1

CISS 255 —  Critical Issues/Global Health Course count: 1 

GPA units: 1

CISS 392 —  The Holocaust Course count: 1 

This seminar deals with the historical, social, political and cultural forces, ideas and events leading up to the Holocaust, the attempted annihilation of all Jews and the almost complete destruction of the European Jewish communities. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course offers a detailed study of this genocide across victims, perpetrators, bystanders and rescuers drawing upon historical documentation, first-person testimonies, photography, visual arts and music. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

ECON 110 —  Principles of Economics Course count: 1 

Economics is the study of the allocation of scarce resources among competing uses. This course is an introduction to economic issues and the tools that economists use to study those issues: supply and demand, decision making by consumers and firms, market failures, economic output and growth, fiscal and monetary policy in relation to unemployment and inflation, interest rates, technological progress, and international economics. Topics include both the study of markets and the need for public policy/government action to address market failures. Course is intended for students who are considering all majors or concentrations which require an introductory economics course. Course makes use of graphing and algebra, and meets for four hours per week.

Antirequisite: Students who have taken either ECON 111 or ECON 112 may not enroll in this course.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ECON 210 —  Economics of European Union Course count: 1 

Applies economic theory (e.g., market equilibrium, externalities, optimal exchange rate arrangements, and welfare effects of free trade) to understand multiple facets of the process of the EU integration. Discusses the history of European integration (with the emphasis on political motivations of different national and political leaders); free mobility of goods, services, capital, and labor; regional income inequality; trade and environmental issues related to Common Agricultural and Common Fisheries Policies; the Euro; labor market policies and unemployment; sustainability of the government-provided pension systems; and the EU as a political player on the world stage.

Prerequisite: ECON 110, ECON 111, or ECON 112.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ECON 215 —  African Economies Course count: 1 

This course will survey the major dynamics of economic growth in specific African countries as well as the dynamics of the continent as an integrated whole. The place of Africas economies in the international economy will be a particular focus. Students will follow a particular country or region throughout the course.

Prerequisite: ECON 111 and ECON 112

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

ECON 216 —  Economics of War & Peace Course count: 1 

Economic principles are applied to better understand the causes and consequences of war and and how to foster peace. Among the topics covered are historical and contemporary trends of violent conflicts in global society including wars between and within states, genocides, and terrorism; key interdependencies between economics and violent conflicts; economic conditions that enhance and inhibit the risk of war; and methods for promoting and sustaining peace.

Prerequisite: ECON 111 and ECON 112. Also, students who have taken Econ 316 may not enroll in this class.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ECON 221 —  Econ Development Modern China Course count: 1 

Aims to provide the student with a sophisticated understanding of economic development in China. The historical circumstances and resource endowments which have constrained Chinese economic development are examined as a basis for analyzing the intentions and success of policies adopted since 1949.

Prerequisite: ECON 110, ECON 111, or ECON 112.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ECON 230 —  Financial Markets and Institutions Course count: 1 

A basic introduction to the main features of financial institutions and markets in the United States. First part covers interest rates, including rate of return calculations, how markets determine the overall level of interest rates and why different securities pay different interest rates. Second part covers financial markets and the assets that are traded on those markets, including the money, bond, stock and derivatives markets. Last section details workings of some financial institutions, including banks, mutual funds and investment banks. When discussing these institutions, particular attention is paid to conflicts of interest.

Prerequisite: ECON 111 and ECON 112. Students who have taken ACCT 275 may not enroll in this course.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ECON 309 —  Comparative Economic Systems Course count: 1 

First segment develops an analytical framework for the comparison of economic systems. Second segment uses this framework to examine and compare the economic systems of various countries including the United States, Germany, France, Japan, China, the former Soviet Union and other East European states.

Prerequisite: ECON 255 and ECON 256

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 114 —  Napoleon to the European Union Course count: 1 

European history from the end of the French Revolution to the aftermath of the collapse of communism in Europe: industrialization, the rise of liberalism and nationalism, the revolutions of 1848, the creation of national states in Italy and Germany, evolution of a consumer culture, European imperialism in Asia and Africa, art and culture of the 19th and 20th centuries, World War I, the rise of Bolshevism, fascism and Nazism, world War II, the history of the cold War, Western European integration, the collapse of communism in eastern Europe, the breakup of the Soviet Union, and the formation and growth of the European Union.

4th year History majors are not eligible to enroll in this course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Annually

HIST 127 —  Modern Latin America Course count: 1 

Surveys the history of 19th- and 20th-century Latin America, focusing on six countries. Topics include the formation of nation-states, the role of the military, the challenges of development and modernization, the Catholic church and liberation theology, social and political movements for reform or revolution, slavery, race relations, the social history of workers and peasants, and inter-American relations. Fulfills one non-Western requirement for the major.

4th year History majors are not eligible to enroll in this course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Spring

HIST 155 —  World War II in East Asia Course count: 1 

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) and Asia-Pacific War (1941-1945). Students will also gain a working familiarity with the history of early and late twentieth-century China and Japan as they study the political and cultural contexts of prewar and postwar East Asia and East Asia-U.S. relations through engagement with a wide variety of primary sources. By exploring a number of issues such as nationalism, popular memory, morality, identity, race, gender, and refugees, students will be exposed to a number of recent and classic debates in the historiography on modern China and Japan.

4th year HIST majors are not eligible to enroll in this course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 198 —  Modern Africa Since 1800 Course count: 1 

A survey of Africa's complex colonial past, examining dominant ideas about colonial Africa and Africans' experiences during colonialism, including important historical debates on Africa's colonial past and the legacy of colonialism; pre-colonial Africa's place in the global world; resistance and response to the imposition and entrenchment of colonialism; and the nature of colonial rule as revealed in economic (under) development, ethnicity and conflict, and the environment.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Fall

HIST 227 —  Muslim Africa Course count: 1 

Much of the discussion of the recent Arab Spring makes little of the fact that these critical events began in North Africa. How should we understand North Africa and Africa, in general, as part of a larger Muslim world? This lecture/discussion course examines the historical, religious, and cultural aspects of the expansion of Muslim Africa. Trade networks extending from north of the Sahara were an undeniable part of the diffusion of Muslim religious practices. However, this course also examines other factors that facilitated and hindered the spread of Islam in Africa including indigenous religion, gender ideologies, the expansion of Christianity, local politics, European colonialism, and the more recent development of Islamist political movements. In order to examine Muslim Africa from all of these perspectives, this course uses primary sources, scholarly articles, novels, and films covering all regions of the continent. This course is useful for students looking for an overview of African history.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

HIST 241 —  French Rebels & Revolutionaries Course count: 1 

From the Revolution of 1789, which gave birth to the nation, to human rights and to citizenship, to the creation of the European Union in the 1990s, France has been at the center of European culture. Paris was rebuilt in the late 19th century as "the capital of Europe," a center of artistic modernism as well as an expanding global empire. During three wars with Germany between 1870 and 1945, the French suffered the devastating effects of total war on their own soil. France played a crucial role in the creation of the European Union but was forced to adapt to becoming a diminishing power in the world since World War II. One unit.

Enrollment limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students only

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

HIST 243 —  Britain & Empire since 1901 Course count: 1 

By the turn of the century, at the height of its power, Britain controlled one quarter of the world's population and one-fifth of its land surface. Over the next 60 years, Britain would lose its status as a world and imperial power. This course focuses on the ways in which imperialism was constitutive of much of the domestic history of Britain from 1901 to 2001, even after Britain lost most of its colonies. Students examine Britain's declining role as a world and imperial power and interrogate the meaning of Britain's national and imperial identities. Discusses the two World Wars with analysis of their economic, social, cultural, and ideological repercussions within Britain and its empire.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 253 —  Soviet Experiment Course count: 1 

This course traces the cataclysmic history of the USSR from its unpredictable beginnings amid the chaos of the First World War to its consolidation as a giant, unified Communist power. It explores the project of socialist revolution and the violent efforts of leaders such as Vladimir Lenin and Josef Stalin to transform an agrarian Russian Imperial Empire into an industrialized Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, abolish private property, and create an egalitarian, atheist, non-capitalist state. We look at the hopes and fears the Revolution inspired, the mechanisms of power in Soviet dictatorship, the practice of repression, and the struggles of everyday life. We pay particular attention to the Soviet experience of the monumental Second World War against Nazi Germany and to the war's aftermath, including the seemingly insurmountable challenges of post-1945 political and economic reform. Most of the semester focuses on the early Soviet period, ending with Stalin's death in 1953.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Annually

HIST 254 —  The Soviet Union After Stalin Course count: 1 

This course examines the Soviet dictatorship from the death of Josef Stalin in 1953 to the sudden, surprise dissolution of the USSR in 1991. While it delves into some of the "high politics" of the era  a narrative shaped by major figures such as Ronald Reagan, Margaret Thatcher, and Mikhail Gorbachev  it also explores social and cultural tensions. What led to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991? What did Soviet citizens think about the world in which they lived and the relationship of their world to that of the West? How did the USSR experience the 1960s? Topics include destalinization, the Space Race, Soviet and U.S. competition in the Third World, resistance movements in Eastern Europe, the roles of science, surveillance, and secrecy in Soviet culture, the rise of the black market, problems of bureaucratic corruption and socialist legality, the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown, and the peaceful revolutions of 1989. Above all, this class considers why Soviet leaders failed in various post-1953 attempts to reform their countrys political and economic system. What can the fate of the Soviet Union teach us about ideology and dictatorship, and what kind of legacy has the Soviet era has left on Russia today?

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 255 —  Eur:Mass Polit/Tot War 1890-1945 Course count: 1 

From the high point of European global power and cultural influence, Europe moved into an era of world war, popular millenarian ideologies, dictatorships, and unprecedented mass murder. This course examines the origins, evolution, and impact of the modern European ideological dictatorships, from the cultural ferment and socioeconomic change that characterized the pre-1914 "belle époque" through the two world wars. Topics include: modern art; liberalism and its discontents; the origins and nature of World War I; the Russian revolutions; the Versailles peace settlement; the struggling interwar democracies; the economic crises; communism and fascism; the Italian, German, and Soviet dictatorships; the Spanish Civil War; and the origins of World War II.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

HIST 256 —  Europe & Superpowers:1939-1991 Course count: 1 

Postwar Europe was shaped in part by four major influences: the clash between Western liberalism and Soviet communism; the withdrawal from overseas empires; the effort to come to terms with the legacy of world war; and the creation of integrative European institutions. Concentrating on Europe, this course examines reciprocal influences between the Europeans and the two peripheral superpowers (USA and USSR) of the Atlantic community. Topics include: World War II, the Holocaust, science and government, the Cold War, the division of Europe, the revival and reinforcement of western European democracy, de-Nazification, Christian democracy, the economic miracle, European integration, the strains of decolonization, the rise of Khrushchev, the Berlin crises, De Gaulle and his vision, protest and social change in the sixties, the Prague Spring, Ostpolitik and détente, the oil shocks, the Cold War refreeze, the Eastern European dissidents, the environmental movement, Gorbachev's reforms, and the collapse of communism. One unit.

Enrollment limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students only

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

HIST 261 —  Germany in Age of Nationalism Course count: 1 

Late to unify, late to industrialize, and late to acquire democratic institutions, Germany had to cope with all three processes at once, with tragic consequences for human rights and international order. This course analyzes the development of German nation-building from the time of Metternich, through the age of Bismarck and the Kaisers, to the Weimar Republic and the rise of Hitler. We explore the trends and circumstances in German and European history that came together to produce Nazism. But we also explore the presence of diversity, the alternative pathways, and the democratic potential in pre-Nazi German history. Topics include religious tension and prejudice (Catholics, Protestants, and Jews), Prusso-Austrian duality, the German confederation, the revolution of 1848, German national liberalism, Bismarck's unification and its legacy, imperial Germany under the Kaisers, German socialism, World War I, the revolution of 1918, the Weimar Republic, and the Nazis.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 262 —  Germany:Dictatorship/Democracy Course count: 1 

In Western Germany after World War II, a people that once had followed Hitler now produced perhaps the most stable democracy in Europe. At the same time, eastern Germans lived under a communist dictatorship that lasted more than three times as long as Hitler's. What is the place of the two postwar Germanies in the broader context of German and European history? To what degree were the two German states a product of their shared past, and to what degree were they products of the Cold War? What are the implications for reunified Germany? This course explores these questions by examining the history of democracy, dictatorship, political ideology, and social change in modern Germany. Topics include: Marx as a German; liberalism, socialism, communism, and political Catholicism in pre-Nazi Germany; popular attitudes toward Nazism; the legacy of Nazism and the Holocaust; the Allied occupation; de-Nazification, the Cold War, and the partition of Germany; Christian Democracy and Social Democracy; the Adenauer era, the Berlin crises, and the economic miracle; German-German relations and the Ostpolitik of Chancellor Willy Brandt; protest politics, Euromissiles, and the Green movement; the development and collapse of East Germany; and Germany since reunification.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 267 —  Modern Italy Course count: 1 

Italy has a long and distinguished history, but its political unification occurred only in 1861. This course analyzes the process of unification, the social and cultural life of 19th-century Italy, the deep divisions between the north and the south, Italy's role in both world wars, fascism and resistance to fascism, the postwar economic miracle, the role of the Mafia in Italian politics, and Italy's role in the formation of the European Union.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Fall

HIST 275 —  U.S. Mexican Border Course count: 1 

This course examines the history and culture of the region encompassing the modern American southwest and Mexican north from Spanish imperialism to modern immigration debates. Particular attention is paid to the interaction of Native, Latin, and Anglo American societies in creating unique ¿borderlands¿ society through the present day. This history offers important insight into processes of religious conflict, political revolution, economic dependency and globalization through Latin American and U.S. history.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 277 —  Afro-Latin America Course count: 1 

This course examines the African Diaspora in Latin America from the aftermath of slavery to the present. We will study the struggles of Afro-Latin America in establishing citizenship and a dignified existence, emphasizing topics such as: liberation movements; gender and racial politics; art; African religions in the Americas; national policies of whitening; and Afro-centric ideologies of the Caribbean. The course extensively uses music as both art and historical text.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 279 —  America's Colony: Puerto Rico since 1898 Course count: 1 

This course analyzes the history of Puerto Ricans from the moment their island became a US territory in 1898 to the present. It analyzes the political status of the island and the cultural, economic and social world of Puerto Ricans both in the island and the mainland United States. The course also highlights how Puerto Ricans have shaped and/or undermined US colonialism.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

HIST 280 —  Modern India Course count: 1 

This course takes us on an intellectual journey through Indias past and present. The course begins with important vignettes of Indian society, culture, and politics prior to the arrival of the British. We will examine how and why various facets of Indian society, namely: economic, legal, religious, and gender relations underwent radical transformation during the British rule. In the second segment of the course, we will study the causes and consequences of the Indian struggle for Independence that ended the British rule, but also led to a violent partition of India in 1947. The third segment of the course will look at some key individuals who sought to implement differing visions of India in the post-colonial era. By following the stories of the historical actors, events, and ideas we will seek to understand how colonial legacy, caste and gender relations, political corruption, and religious fundamentalism have shaped the contemporary Indian society.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

HIST 282 —  Modern China Course count: 1 

Introduction to events, personalities, and concepts of particular significance for understanding Chinas development from a traditional empire considered so weak that it was called the sick man of Asia to a modern state that will continue to play a major role in a global world. Covers the period from the Opium Wars in the mid-nineteenth century through the post-Maoist reforms using a variety of sources, including documents, film, literature, reportage and memoirs. Topics covered include ongoing debates within China itself about the often competing demands of modernization, nationalism, traditionalism, feminism, social justice, economic imperatives, rule of law, and human rights.

Enrollment limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students only

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 286 —  Modern Japan Course count: 1 

This course begins by surveying political, social, economic and cultural developments during the so-called ¿early modern¿ period of Japanese history (1600-1850), when the country was governed by the samurai military class. The focus then shifts to the period between the 1850 and 1930, when Japan undertook a thoroughgoing ¿modern¿ revolution that transformed it into a major military, industrial and colonial power that rivaled Europe and the United States. While modernization resolved some of the challenges facing the country in the 19th-century, it also posed a new set of challenges for Japanese -that culminated in the Pacific War.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 290 —  Sex and Society in Africa Course count: 1 

The common images we have of African women and men paint a confusing picture. Sometimes African women are portrayed as vulnerable, poor, and in desperate need of aid. In other examples, African women are seen as bold and innovative in the face of poverty and neglect. Moreover, both of these scenarios imply that African men are either absent or violent and, generally, at the center of problems ailing African societies. How do we integrate more complex and varied depictions of African women, men, and families into our study of African history? Are gender issues categorically different in Africa? Are Westerners forcing their ideas on African communities? Can Africans and the scholars who study African history help us think differently about the relationships between women, men, and society? Readings include theoretical pieces and case studies on five specific regions/countries of the continent: Nigeria/Benin (West Africa), Morocco (North Africa), South Africa, Kenya (East Africa), and Congo-Kinshasa (Central Africa). We cover key themes in womens and gender studies such as power relations, feminism, womens voices, and sexuality as well as broader historical issues including religion, health, and politics. Specific topics in African history include state-building, colonialism, nationalism, apartheid, and democratization. Students generally interested in African history or in women's and gender history will find this course useful.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 291 —  Making Modrn MidEast 1882-1952 Course count: 1 

The making of the modern Middle East began in the late 19th century when the Ottoman Empire, which, since the 16th century, controlled much of the region we today call the Middle East (with the exception of Iran), inaugurated a state-guided modernization movement in order to protect its territorial integrity and remain a great power. Despite its best efforts, increasing Ottoman vulnerability vis-a-vis the European powers and the Ottoman decision to side with Germany in the Great War resulted in the Entente powers dismantling of the Empire in 1920 following the war. They divided it into individual nation states each under French or British imperial control. From that time, the newly created nations of the Middle East (such as Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon)  guided by their imperial overlords and now separated from their Ottoman past  worked to create the basic institutions of the nation state (government, administration, army) and to develop a common sense of national identity and allegiance to these neophyte governments. This course examines the making of the modern Middle East from the late-19th to mid-20th centuries  a time of great political, socio-economic, and cultural transformation in the region. We will focus in particular on European imperialism in the Middle East, the rise of local nationalisms (such as Arab, Turkish, Jewish), the politics of nation-state formation, and the rise of feminist, workers, and student movements. One unit.

Students who took HIST 121 may not enroll in this course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

HIST 292 —  Making of the Mod Mid East II Course count: 1 

This course examines the cultural and political history of the Middle East (Egypt, the Levant, Palestine/Israel, Iraq, Iran, Turkey and the Gulf States) from World War II until the recent Arab Uprisings. Through literature and film, the course highlights the major trends and themes in the history of the region including the effects of European imperialism and the Cold War, the Iranian Revolution, the birth of the oil economy, the rise of political Islam, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the U.S. led invasions of Iraq, and most recently, the Arab Uprisings and the rise of ISIS.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 296 —  South Africa & Apartheid Course count: 1 

South Africa's past is a painful history of deep racial discrimination, racialized violence, and segregation. But it is also a history of human resilience and the struggle for equality. This resilience is exemplified by the participation of women and men from diverse racial and social backgrounds, who struggled to end the racist policies of apartheid in South Africa. A course such as this one therefore draws students to debate some of the most important philosophies of an engaged Jesuit education, including a deep commitment to the well-being of the human community and the pursuit of a more just society. In dealing with the many controversies that mark South African history, students will develop their abilities to think critically and logically via weekly journal responses to course readings.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 322 —  War and Cinema Course count: 1 

Course examines the depiction of war in American and British cinema, contrasting filmed versions to historical events, and studying reception by audiences. Readings will include both analysis of the historical events and background to the filmed versions, and will stress historiography. Emphasis will be given to the nature of film as a primary source reflecting the perspectives of the society generating it. After a brief look at films made during and about World War One ("Big Parade," "J'Accuse," "Regeneration," "Paths of Glory"), we will be guided by Mark Harris's Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War (2014), to study the effect of war on the work of five major directors (Ford, Stevens, Huston, Wyler, Capra), among others. Films studied will include "December 7th", "Mrs. Miniver," "Since You Went Away," "Cry Havoc!" "So Proudly We Hail," "Open City," "The Third Man," "The Best Years of Our Lives," "They Were Expendable."Other readings include: Greene, The Third Man; Henriksen, Dr. Strangelove's America; Basinger, WW2 Combat Film; Christensen, Reel Politics; Terkel, "The Good War"; Rollins, Hollywood as Historian; Rosenstone, Visions of the Past.

Prerequisite: HIST 200

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Every Third Year, Fall

HIST 327 —  Cultures of Cold War Course count: 1 

The superpower struggle that shaped the world post-1945 involved a competition not only for military might, but also for moral supremacy. During this time, the United States and the Soviet Union came to define themselvesin opposition to each other, both seeking to demonstrate the superiority of their respective social and political systems and advertise the alleged degeneracy of those of their arch-rivals. This course looks at how each country portrayed its own society and imagined that of its major global foe, and the way these representations often differed from reality. Because the major emphasis is on the shaping and re-shaping of values and identities, it draws heavily on cultural sources such as novels, short stories, films, cartoons, and music lyrics, aswell as other more traditional primary and secondary historical texts. One unit.

Prerequisite: HIST 200 or one 200-level course in 20th C U.S., European or Soviet history.

GPA units: 1

HIST 329 —  Collapse of Communism Course count: 1 

What led to the surprise collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991? Why did the country fail in numerous attempts, the first begun immediately after the death of Josef Stalin, to reform its political and economic system? What did Soviet citizens think about the world in which they lived, and the relationship of their world to that of the West? What about to that of China and the East? What has replaced the Soviet system  how is Russia today different from the Russia under Communist rule? Finally, what do we hope to learn from our study of the collapse? What kind of lessons about power, ideology, and freedom are to be found in the fate of the former Soviet superpower? This course will explore the final decades of the Soviet regime, the countrys troubled transition from Communism to capitalism, and the evolution of Communist and post-Communist identities and values. Above all, it will examine the different and conflicting studies of these topics that have been undertaken by different groups with different agendas at different times and assess their historical and political significance.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 365 —  Resistance & Rev in Mod Africa Course count: 1 

A critical study of anti-colonial nationalist struggles and their outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa. The course traces the political economy of colonialism; the origins, rise and dynamics of anti-colonial nationalism; the strategy of armed insurrection and the role of revolutionary socialism. Lastly, it grapples with aspects of post-colonial Africa that reveal the changing balance between internal and external forces in specific African nations, the ambiguities of African independence, and post-colonial debates on nation and nationalism.

Prerequisite: History majors must have HIST 200. Other majors must have taken one History course or permission.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years, Spring

ITAL 323 —  Intro to Contemporary Italy Course count: 1 

Explores the history and the culture of Italy from Fascism to contemporary Italy, passing through the economic boom, the ¿Leaden Years,¿ and the Mafia. Along with historical and cultural information, students will read newspaper articles, letters, excerpts from novels and short stories from authors such as Calvino, Levi, and others. They will also see films by directors like Scola, e Sica, and Giordana.

Prerequisite: ITAL 301

GPA units: 1

PHIL 255 —  Asian Philosophy Course count: 1 

What is the ultimate goal of human existence, if any? Are there qualities of persons or actions that promote harmony with the community or with nature at large? Is there a soul that exists beyond this life? Is there really a self at all? Is there a permanent reality beneath the visible world of changeor is the motley of change all there is to the world? We shall explore these fundamental philosophical questions through key Asian traditions of wisdom such as Confucianism, Daoism, Hinduism and Buddhism. Not only is an understanding of these wisdom traditions valuable in themselves, itll also help us understand better the Asian nations which social, political, ethical and cultural practices are founded on Asian philosophy.

Enrollment limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students only

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Philosophical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

PHIL 361 —  Confucian Values & Human Rights Course count: 1 

Discourse about Confucian values, frequently known as "Asian Values," provided strong resistance to Western rights. Arguing that human rights are not universal because of their origin in the West, Asian nations urge that consideration be given to their cultural and historical situations which justify their own brand of human rights. Confucian values are being invoked by the Chinese government in political discussions with the U.S. This seminar focuses on primary texts by Confucius, Mencius and two other early Confucian texts, in order to understand the philosophical concepts which constitute Confucian values. We will survey some contemporary literatures on human rights to come to an understanding of the highly contested concept of human rights. Ultimately, we examine what values are Confucian, whether they are compatible with human rights, (especially the first- and second-generation rights), and if one of these is prior to the other for Confucianism. We ask if there are resources within Confucian values which can contribute to a better understanding of human rights.

Prerequisite: One previous Philosophy course. Enrollment is limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

POLS 102 —  Intro To Comparative Politics Course count: 1 

A comparative analysis of political processes and institutions in Western liberal democracies, Communist and post-Communist states, and developing nations. Focuses on alternative models of economic and political modernization and on the causes of and prospects for the current wave of democratization throughout the world. Comparative Politics.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

POLS 103 —  Intro To Internat'l Relations Course count: 1 

Introduces students to major theories and concepts in international politics and examines the evolution of the international system during the modern era. Principal topics include: the causes of war and peace, the dynamics of imperialism and post-colonialism, the emergence of global environmental issues, the nature and functioning of international institutions, the legal and ethical obligations of states, and the international sources of wealth and poverty. International Relations.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

POLS 207 —  American Presidency Course count: 1 

Studies the presidency as an office that shapes its occupants just as profoundly as specific presidents have shaped the character of the office. Traces the historical evolution of the presidency from the founding to the present. Among the topics considered are: presidential selection, the president as party leader, war powers and the president as commander in chief, the president as the nation's chief administrator, and the president as legislative leader. American Government.

Prerequisite: POLS 100

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 217 —  The Constitution in Wartime Course count: 1 

Examines the interpretation and operation of the U.S. Constitution in times of war. Investigates how the Constitutions war powers are allocated between the branches of government and the ways in which constitutional rights and liberties are protectedor not protectedin wartime. The inquiry includes a series of historical and contemporary case studies, including the Civil War, World War II, the Cold War, and the war on terror. American Politics.

Prerequisite: POLS 100 or permission of instructor.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 235 —  Islamic Political Thought Course count: 1 

Political movements inspired by Islam continue to shape politics across the world. In this course we will attempt to get behind the headlines and familiarize ourselves with the various currents of political thought in Islam. We will study the historical origins of political thought in Islam, the fundamentalist currents, and the efforts to present a liberal understanding of Islam. We will consider a range of political issues including: Islam and democracy, Islam and womens rights, Islam and the rights of minorities, and Islam and political violence. We will study a range of authors from the medieval period to present day.

Prerequisite: POLS 101

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

POLS 252 —  The Politics of Post-Communism Course count: 1 

This course explores the politics of the successor states to the former Soviet Union. It will focus in particular on Russia, Ukraine, the Caucasus and Central Asia. Topics to be covered include: democratization vs. a reversion to authoritarian rule, the transition to market economy, organized crime and corruption, the search for new post-Communist national identities, the Chechen conflict, the impact of so-called "color revolutions" in former Soviet republics, Russia and the West, and the roles of Islam and oil politics in Central Asia. Comparative Politics.

Anti-requisite: Students who took HIST 299/Russia Reborn? 1991-Present, will not be permitted to take POLS 252.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 257 —  Politics Of Development Course count: 1 

How can the world's less developed countries achieve sustainable development (in environmental, economic, and political terms)? This course discusses structural and institutional challenges to sustainable development in the global South, investigates different responses to these challenges (and their different degrees of success), and assesses the impact of development--and underdevelopment--on both societies and the environment.Comparative Politics.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 259 —  Nat Res Conflicts in Latin Am Course count: 1 

The course will investigate the nature of conflicts over natural resources in Latin America, their causes, and the position of the many stakeholders involved in them. It will also evaluate the diverse governance schemes that have been either proposed or implemented to solve such conflicts. The course will pay particular attention to the struggles of Latin American grassroots groups and social movements -- indigenous peoples, landless peasants, and fishing folk, among others -- for access to natural resources and environmental goods. Not all Latin American citizens have enjoyed unimpeded access to natural resources, whether such resources are common (as in public forests, oil and gas reserves, or clean air), formally owned by them, or located on their land. This reality  which has historical roots  persists today and may be aggravated in the future, despite the formal adoption of liberal democracy and the rule of law in most countries in the region. Acute economic and political power disparities among groups competing for natural resources contribute to create a permissive climate for systematic violations of environmental, social and cultural rights associated with such resources. Violations lead to new conflicts and aggravate old ones. Comparative politics.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

POLS 265 —  European Politics Course count: 1 

Explores the relationship between states and citizens in Western Europe, with particular focus on Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. Major topics include the nature and sources of nationalism, the ongoing transformation of national identity, revolutionary and reactionary traditions in European politics, the politics of immigration, the political effects of economic modernization, and the politics of European integration. Comparative Politics.

Prerequisite: POLS 102

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 270 —  African Politics Course count: 1 

This course is designed to examine the countries of Africa in comparative perspective. In doing so, the class highlights the most important issues in African politics and governance and the most difficult problems that African states face. The course presents a holistic view of Africa and a multifaceted look at countries found on the continent. Instead of merely focusing on the various problems facing the continent, this course looks at examples of both the successes and failures of African states in addressing the challenges they face. Comparative Politics.

Prerequisite: POLS 102 or African Studies Concentrator or permission of instructor.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 272 —  Politics Of The Middle East Course count: 1 

An examination of politics in selected Middle Eastern countries. Begins with a brief overview of the rise and spread of Islam in the region and the establishment of Muslim empires, then turns to an exploration of the role of European colonialism in post-independence Middle Eastern politics. Analyzes various explanations for the difficulty of establishing durable democracies in the region, explores the political implications of religious identity and secular nationalism, and assesses prospects for peaceful resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Comparative Politics.

Prerequisite: POLS 102 or Middle Eastern Studies majors or minors.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

POLS 273 —  Race& Politics in the Americas Course count: 1 

The construction of race and ethnicity in Latin America has followed distinct historical and institutional trajectories. In some ways, racial politics in Latin America looks very different than in the United States. In other ways, however, racial paradigms in parts of Latin America and the United States mirror one another. This seminar will explore the interaction between race, ethnicity, and politics in the United States and Latin America. Specifically, it will examine the following questions: How do constructions of racial and ethnic identity vary across countries in the Americas? Why is ethnoracial group identity salient for some populations but not for others, and to what extent does ethnoracial identity formation shape candidate evaluation, political mobilization, and voting patterns? We will first focus on the politics of Afro-descendant and Indigenous populations in Latin America. In the last weeks of the course, we will study changes and continuity in the identity and political behavior of Latin Americans and their descendants in the United States. Comparative Politics.

Prerequisite: POLS 102 and POLS 272

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 274 —  China from Mao to Market Course count: 1 

Explores the history of modern China from the Opium Wars of the 1840s to the present. Two central themes are the tension between reform and revolution as alternative paths for the modernization of China and whether, in order to emerge as a great power, China should embrace or reject Western models and values. This course focuses on the following questions: (1) the rise of the Communist Party and the reasons for its victory over the Nationalists; (2) Maos ideological campaigns of the 1950s and 1960s, culminating in the Cultural Revolution; (3) the dynamics and dilemmas of post-Mao economic and political reform; (4) the 1989 Democracy Movement and the prospects for democratization in present-day China. Comparative Politics.

Prerequisite: POLS 102

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 275 —  Internat'l Political Economy Course count: 1 

This course is designed to be an introduction to international political economy. Provides an overview of theories of international political economy, a historical review of the international political economy in light of these theories, and an application of the theoretical approaches to issues of trade, monetary relations, finance, and development. Readings and discussion focus on issues of conflict and cooperation; the relationship between the international system and domestic politics; economic growth, development, and equity; and the connections between the study of economics and politics. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103 or International Studies major.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 276 —  South Asian Politics Course count: 1 

Prerequisite: POLS 102 or POLS 103

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 278 —  East Asia in World Politics Course count: 1 

This course examines China's emergence as a major power, and surveys the relationships of East Asian states with each other and with external powers including the United States. In addition to China, substantial attention is given to Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. Topics covered include military competition and regional security, trade relations, globalization, human rights, and potential conflict flashpoints such as North Korea and Taiwan. International Relations.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 281 —  Global Governance Course count: 1 

Although the international system is characterized by anarchy  by the absence of central government  it is not without order. Relations among states and other actors are increasingly characterized by transnational rules, regulations, and authority relationships. How is global order produced, sustained, and regulated? Whose order is it? This course examines the structures through which international actors attempt to organize their relations with each other. Topics include the history and function of international organizations (including the United Nations), rules governing the use of force, economic integration, and global civil society. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 282 —  American Foreign Policy Course count: 1 

Explores major themes in U.S. foreign policy, focusing on the longstanding and ongoing debate between international engagement and isolationism. Topics discussed include the historical evolution of U.S. foreign policy, the roles played by specific institutional and societal actors in the formulation of policy, and contemporary issues facing the United States including international trade and finance, proliferation and regional security, the resort to force, human rights, and humanitarian intervention. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103 or International Studies major.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 284 —  Human Rights Course count: 1 

Since World War II, questions of human rights have come to occupy a central place in international politics. This course examines the historical evolution and political effects of international human rights norms. Topics include the philosophical and legal basis of human rights, the origins of modern human rights, the origins of modern human rights covenants in the aftermath of Nazi atrocities, the effects of the Cold War on human rights politics, the tensions between national sovereignty and international human rights standards, the debate between universalist and particularist conceptions of human rights, patterns of compliance with human rights agreements, and the development of human rights enforcement mechanisms. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 285 —  Global Environmental Politics Course count: 1 

This course analyzes the roles of national governments, international institutions, and non-state actors in managing global and cross-border environmental problems. Principal topics include the process of international environmental negotiation, the nature of existing international environmental agreements, and the theoretical and practical problems involved in environmental protection and regulation at the international level. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103 or ENVS majors or minors.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

POLS 287 —  Humanitarianism Course count: 1 

The aim of this course is to develop a nuanced understanding of the history and practice of humanitarianism, defined as the desire to relieve the suffering of distant strangers. Once the domain of volunteers, humanitarianism is today an expansive, professional field of endeavor; its study offers insights into the motivations as well as consequences of organized forms of compassionate action. Students in this course investigate current themes and debates in the field of humanitarianism, including questions of politicization and military intervention, professionalization, human rights and advocacy, and accountability; explore different hypotheses regarding the causes and consequences of humanitarian crises; and critically analyze the effects  intended and unintended  of humanitarian action. International Relations.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 288 —  Politics of Globalization Course count: 1 

Economic globalization has wrought far-reaching changes on the United States and the world. Although globalization has made the world wealthier, it has not met with universal approval. In the United States, some of the changes associated with globalization  such as the outsourcing of large numbers of factory jobs and the influx of large numbers of immigrants  have provoked a political backlash. This course examines the political consequences of globalization, especially in the United States, and asks how the United States might adapt itself more effectively to a globalized world. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103 or International Studies major.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 289 —  International Law Course count: 1 

Given the anarchical structure of the international system, the very existence of international law is paradoxical. Nevertheless, despite the emphasis often placed upon conflict and discord in global politics, for centuries states have propagated rules to facilitate cooperation and mutual restraint. What motivates these efforts? How successful are they in moderating the effects of international anarchy? This course will address these questions. Topics will include the historical development of international law, defenses and critiques of international law in theories of global politics, how international law is made, interpreted and enforced in international institutions, and the working of international law in various issue-areas, including the use of military force, the regulation of global trade, and the protection of the global environment. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103 or permission of instructor.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 290 —  National Security Policy Course count: 1 

Focuses on contemporary national security problems faced by the United States as it seeks to manage the post-Cold War international order. Topics include relations with other major powers and with the Islamic world, U.S. military interventions abroad, terrorism, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and nuclear strategy. Attention is also given to the domestic dimensions of U.S. security policy, including the politics of weapons procurement and the longstanding ideological debate regarding American national interest. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 320 —  Political Violence Course count: 1 

Explores contemporary political violence through a series of in-depth case studies across time and space. Topics include the psychological/sociological profile of revolutionaries or terrorists, the causes of and justifications for political violence, the internal dynamics of revolutionary or terrorist movements, explanations for their success or failure, and the ways in which states have attempted to deal with the aftermath of mass political violence. Comparative Politics.

Prerequisite: POLS 102 or POLS 103 or PCON Concentrators.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

POLS 325 —  Politics of the Undocumented Course count: 1 

Why are some native and immigrant populations undocumented? What conditions produce undocumented populations, and how do undocumented populations affect labor market structures, social welfare, inter-ethnic relations, processes racialization, and electoral politics? This course will explore these questions using case studies of undocumented and legally precarious populations primarily in the Americas. The course will also examine how states document and regulate their populations, and how states enforces constructions of citizenship and ethno-national identity through its legal-bureaucratic apparatus. It will draw from theories on welfare-state development and international norms, among others, and study specific cases in the region, including the United States, Canada, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and a few countries in South America.

Enrollment limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students only

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 326 —  Citizenship/Contemp Latin Amer Course count: 1 

An interdisciplinary course that fulfills major and concentration requirements for Political Science, Latin American Studies and Peace and Conflict Studies. Aims to maximize students' understanding and actual experience of citizenship struggles in Latin America. Discusses key concepts and approaches to the study of social movements in the region, as well as empirical citizenship struggles implemented by different populations (indigenous peoples, forest people, landless groups, labor, and women, in different Latin American countries). Active participation by students, through class discussions and presentations, is a major requirement of the course.

Prerequisite: POLS 102 or POLS 103 or LALC majors or concentrators.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 333 —  Sem: Ethics & Intn'l Relations Course count: 1 

Can considerations of justice and morality be incorporated successfully into national foreign policies, given the will to do so? Or must a successful foreign policy always be amoral? This course examines problems of ethical choice as they relate to international politics. Topics include the relationship between ethical norms and international law, the laws of war, the tension between human rights and state sovereignty, the ethical implications of global inequity, and the difficulties involved in applying standards of moral judgment to the international sphere. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103 or CISS 130 or International Studies major.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

PSYC 314 —  Science, Medicine & the Holocaust Course count: 1 

What can be learned of biomedical ethics from a study of the Holocaust? How did a healing profession justify its murderous actions? Were physicians and scientists pawns of a totalitarian regime, or were they active contributors to the racial Nazi ideology? Is the study of genetics susceptible to the same political forces that corrupted the field of eugenics? How did the Holocaust come to shape our current code of ethics in human experimentation? This seminar will seek answers to these and many related questions from a voluminous literature that is populated by contributions from historians, biomedical ethicists, philosophers, theologians, journalists, and artists. Far from a value-free discipline, ideological forces will be shown to be at the core of scientific inquiry. This lesson is of particular importance to aspiring scientists and health practitioners.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

RELS 106 —  Buddhism Course count: 1 

Survey of the Buddhist tradition, from its origins in ancient India through its evolution as a pan-Asian faith. Topics include the legends of the Buddha, the early monastic community, the emergence of Theravada and Mahayana teachings, Buddhist ethics and social philosophy, meditation traditions, and the later development of distinctive Tibetan, Chinese, and Japanese schools. Utilizes textual and anthropological sources.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RELS 107 —  Islam Course count: 1 

Examination of Islamic religious beliefs and practices from the origins of Islam to the present. Particular stress is placed on Islamic religious ideals, institutions and personalities. Central topics include: Islamic scripture and traditions, prophecy, law, rituals, theology and philosophy, sectarianism, mysticism, aesthetic ideals, art and architecture, pedagogy, and modern reinterpretations of the tradition. Also explores wider issues of religious identity by looking at the diversity of the Islamic tradition, tensions between elite and popular culture, and issues of gender and ethnicity.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RELS 147 —  Judaism Course count: 1 

Introduction to the history, theology, and practices of the Jews which uses the evidence of Judaism to exemplify the interrelationship between a religious civilization and the historical and cultural framework within which it exists. How does what happens to the Jews affect their formulation of their religion, Judaism? By answering this question and by learning the details of Jewish belief and practice, students will come to com-prehend both Judaism and the social construction of religion in general.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Annually

RELS 216 —  Readings: Asian Sacred Texts Course count: 1 

Focuses on critical and analytical readings of sacred writings in translation from the Asian religious traditions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daosim. The genres sampled include law codes, works of ascetic mysticism, religious biography, popular narrative, and scholastic treatises. Also examines the cross-cultural definition of "text," the idea of a "scriptural canon," and the construction of tradition in the western historical imagination.

Prerequisite: One previous course in Asian Religions

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

RELS 270 —  The Quran Course count: 1 

This seminar will give students a window into the religious and spiritual world shaped and filled by the Quran. The topics covered will relate to Islam in general and the Quran in particular, such as language, law, mysticism, theology, art, and comparative religion. This will involve a study of the exegesis of the text, which records the ways in which Muslims have interpreted and taught the Quran through the ages up to our present day.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Spring

RELS 279 —  Religion and Violence Course count: 1 

Religion and Violence considers religious justifications of violence. The course begins with an examination of sacrifice through a survey of Aztec culture in relation to the theory of generative scapegoating articulated by Rene Girard. The course then moves to discuss religious justifications of warfare as crusade and jihad. The class also reads the Hindu epic The Mahabharata and examines its theory of ethical obligation in extreme circumstances. The course then considers terrorism through a comparative discussion of the Provisional Irish Republican Army and Palestinian organizations such as Hamasand Islamic Jihad. A crucial part of this discussion is engaging ethical theories regarding the classification of non-combatantsas well as considering both critiques and defenses of asymmetrical forms of violence. Substantial attention will be given to analyzing the category terrorism and to what extent it has value as a classification for certain kinds of violence. The class concludes with a consideration of violence to the body as reflected in asceticism, torture, and ordeal.

Prerequisite: One previous Religious Studies course or consent of the instructor

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

RELS 280 —  Liberation Theology Course count: 1 

Based on the principle of God's special identification with history's oppressed, liberation theology explores the problems of biblical interpretation, church teaching and Christian commitment in the contemporary world. This course examines the relationship between the socio-political consciousness of marginalized peoples and their Christian faith. Among the topics to be covered will be racism, global poverty, sexism, and environmental degradation. This course has three primary sections: (1) Black Theology; (2) Latin American Liberation Theology; (3) Feminist Theology.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Annually

RELS 290 —  Teología Andina Course count: 1 

A study of religion, culture, and theology in the Andean region of Bolivia. The course examines the way in which Christian faith has been appropriated by the Aymara and Quechua people, and it introduces students to a worldview that is both distinctive and challenging in its focus on the earth (the Pachamama) and community life. The course also studies the history of cultural and social oppression that paved the way for contemporary efforts in the region at religious and political self-expression. Taught in Spanish; requires the ability to read, speak, and write in Spanish.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Alternate Years, Fall

RELS 311 —  Zen Buddhism Course count: 1 

Examination of Zen Buddhism and its influences on East Asian civilizations. Surveys the texts and monastic practices that define Zen spiritual cultivation and the history of the Soto and Rinzai schools¿ evolution. Special attention is also devoted to the distinctive poetic (haiku), fine arts (painting, gardening, tea ceremony)) and martial arts (swordsmanship) disciplines that this tradition has inspired in China and Japan.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Spring

RELS 312 —  Theravada Buddhism Course count: 1 

Seminar examining the prominent texts, doctrines and practices of the Theravada Buddhist tradition. Surveys the historical development of the tradition in India, with attention to major schools of interpretation and practice. Theravada social philosophy and ethics are studied, as are the patterns of accommodation with non-Buddhist religions. The second half of the course focuses upon the distinctive practices of Burma, Sri Lanka, and Thailand as well as reformist modern movements.

Prerequisite: RELS 206 or permission of instructor.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

RELS 315 —  Islamic Philosophy & Theology Course count: 1 

Introduction to the major issues, figures, and texts of Islamic philosophy and theology. Attempts to answer the question of what Islamic philosophy and theology are and how they figure in Islamic tradition. While dealing with such towering figures as Kindi, Farabi, Ibn Sina, Ghazali, Ibn Rushd, Ibn Hazm, Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Bajjah, Suhrawardi, the school of Ibn al-Arabi, Nasir al-Din Tusi, and Mulla Sadra, also discusses central issues and concepts of Islamic philosophy, including existence and essence, God's existence and knowledge of the world, knowledge and its foundations, cosmology, causality and its role in sciences of nature and political thought. Kalam or Islamic theology is the focus of the second part of the course. Examines classical debates around such issues as God's names and qualities, free will and determinism, reason and revelation, ethics, and political philosophy.

Prerequisite: One previous Religious Studies or Philosophy course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

RELS 327 —  Holocaust: Confronting Evil Course count: 1 

Seeks to interpret an event that defies representation and lacks discernible logic or meaning. By evaluating how others have depicted, attempted to create meaningful narratives about, and drawn conclusions from the Holocaust, we hope ourselves to reach some understanding of this event, of its significance for modern society, and of its potential for helping us to recognize our own responsibilities in a world in which ultimate evil is possible.

Prerequisite: One previous Religious Studies course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Annually

SOCL 210 —  Consumer & Corp Sustainability Course count: 1 

This course asks what it means to be a good citizen, good consumer, and good corporation in light of contemporary social and environmental problems by focusing on the relationship between democracy and capitalism. It investigates the complexities of understanding and implementing social responsibility on the local, national, and global level.

Prerequisite: SOCL 101

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

SOCL 280 —  Global Culture & Society Course count: 1 

Global Culture & Society

Prerequisite: SOCL 101

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

SOCL 281 —  Sociology of Travel & Tourism Course count: 1 

This course focuses on the relationship between tourism and social life by considering how tourist practices are socially shaped and made meaningful within social contexts. This course explores tourism as a lens through which we can understand many of the features of contemporary social life, including modernity and postmodernity, consumption and cultural commodification, the aestheticization of everyday life, authenticity, embodiment, identity, gender, risk, technology, mobility and globalization.

Prerequisite: SOCL 101

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

SOCL 376 —  Women and Non-Violence Course count: 1 

This course surveys some of the most exemplary cases of womens efforts to use nonviolence in resistance, social change, and peace building. We will investigate how womens unique social location shapes their particular contribution to the conceptualization and implementation of nonviolence. And we will consider the significance of their efforts in constructing new social spaces for peace and justice. A global range of cases will be explored with a special focus on women in the developing world.

Prerequisite: SOCL 101

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

SPAN 304 —  Aspects of Spanish-American Culture Course count: 1 

Devoted to the study of processes of cultural change in Spanish America from pre-Columbian times to the present, with a focus on the layering of beliefs and practices of Hispanic, Indigenous, and African origin. Readings and documentaries highlight the diversity of the five main cultural regions--Caribbean, Andes, Southern Cone, Central America, and North America.Includes an optional Community-Based Learning Project in the local Latinx community. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 301, 302 or equivalent. This course satisfies the Culture and Cinema requirement for the Spanish Major. 4th year students by permission only.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Language Studies

Typically Offered: Annually

SPAN 421 —  Spanish Film Course count: 1 

Studies some of the most relevant historical, political, and social issues in 20th-century Spain as depicted through film. Focuses on films which portray Spain at its different historical stages (pre-Franco era, Francoist Spain, transition era, and modern Spain). Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 305 and a semester of Readings (308 or 309)

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Every Third Year