English (ENGL)

ENGL 100 —  Intro to Literary Study Course count: 1 

How does literature matter? What use is figurative language? What truth can literature offer? This course teaches students how literary texts produce meaning through genre and form. Through frequent analytical writing assignments based on the readings, the course helps students learn to present complex arguments with clarity, logic, and persuasive style.

Anti-requisite: Students who have taken a CRAW course cannot enroll in ENGL 100.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 110 —  Introduction to Academic Writing Course count: 1 

Devoted to improving the student's writing through frequent revisions. Intensive work during the semester concentrates on the student's own writing, which is examined in class and in conference with the instructor.Class size limited to 12 students.

Enrollment limited to 1st year students only

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 130 —  Poetry and Poetics Course count: 1 

The study of poetry is central to the study of literature, since it is in poetry that the power of language-play is at its most intense. This course investigates how poetry produces emotional and intellectual effects through language, sound, and form. Examining poems from a broad range of writers and periods, students will hone close reading skills as they engage with the devices poets use to prompt imaginative work in their readers. All sections will be writing-intensive, using the drafting process to develop and refine literary analysis and ultimately to present it in the form of persuasive critical arguments. The course is required for English majors, who are encouraged to take it as early as possible to prepare for more advanced literary study.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 141 —  Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry Course count: 1 

An introductory course in the study of the form and technique of poetry. As readers of literature we study how a work of art and an artist's vision are pieced together; as aspiring writers of literature we come to have a hands-on understanding of how a poem is created. Emphasis is on the intensive reading of modern and contemporary poems, though the assignments are creative. Class size limited to 12 students.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 142 —  Introduction to Creative Writing: Narrative Course count: 1 

An introductory course in the study of the varied forms and techniques of fiction and non-fiction. Emphasis is on the intensive reading and writing of various prose forms. Lectures on form, language and finding material for inspiration. Class size limited to 12 students.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 200 —  Masterpieces of British Literature Course count: 1 

A study of selected major works of British Literature. Non-majors only.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Annually

ENGL 201 —  Masterpieces of American Literature Course count: 1 

A study of selected major works of American Literature. Non-majors only.

Prerequisite: Students who are English majors are unable to enroll in this course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Annually

ENGL 210 —  Intermediate Academic Writing Course count: 1 

Intensive reading and writing of expository essays to develop the student's authorial voice and style. Students for whom English is a second language or who come from a diverse or multicultural background will receive special help in some sections; consult the instructor. Permission of instructor required. Class size limited to 12.

Enrollment limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students only

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 211 —  Opposites Attract: Science Writing Course count: 1 

Focuses on the study and practice of various types of writing about scientific phenomena; considers fundamental questions about the relationship between scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 212 —  Introduction to Screenwriting Course count: 1 

Covers the fundamentals of screenwriting (format, characterization, narrative arcs) through original creative work and close reading of example screenplays. Students will adapt a literary work to learn form, as well as draft, workshop, and revise their own scripts. Class size limited to 12. Permission of instructor required.

Prerequisite: ENGL 141 or 142 or 143

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 230 —  Touchstones 1: Early Brit Lit Course count: 1 

This course examines the development of British literature from its beginnings to 1720, presenting at least six common texts while developing the close reading skills initiated at the introductory level of the major. Authors include Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope and Defoe. Should be taken after Poetry & Poetics and before any 300-level course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 231 —  Touchstones 2A: American Lit Course count: 1 

This course examines the development of American literature from its beginnings to the present, presenting at least six common texts while developing the close reading skills initiated at the introductory level of the major. Authors include Poe, Douglass, Dickinson, Whitman, Faulkner, Morrison, and Alvarez. One of two courses that can fulfill the English major Touchstones 2 requirement. Should be taken after Poetry & Poetics and before any 300-level course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 232 —  Touchstones 2B: Brit&Anglo Lit Course count: 1 

This course examines the development of British literature from 1720 to the present, presenting at least six common texts while developing the close reading skills initiated at the introductory level of the major. Authors include Wordsworth, Coleridge, Dickens, T.S. Eliot, Woolf, Beckett and Ishiguro. One of two courses that fulfill the Touchstones 2 requirement. Should be taken after Poetry & Poetics and before any 300-level course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 240 —  Ekphrasis Course count: 1 

From the Greeks onward, ekphrasis, or the practice of writing vivid description about art, has provided an excellent foundation for the development of imaginative writing in all genres. In this unique creative writing course, students will work in a museum setting to produce ekphrastic responses to artworks in several genres. They will try their hand at poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction, engaging their creativity as they learn the basic craft issues specific to each genre. No experience in creative writing or knowledge of visual art is required -- all students are welcome. This course will challenge your creativity and enlarge your understanding of both creative writing and visual art, but it will be rigorously playful, taking advantage of the creative environment of the Worcester Art Museum. Open to English majors and non-majors; no previous creative writing knowledge required;  class size limited to 12.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Arts

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 241 —  Intermediate Poetry Workshop Course count: 1 

For students who have taken any introductory creative writing course. A more advanced course on the reading and writing of poems with emphasis on prosody, writing in closed and open forms, and writing various types of poems. Lecture and workshop format with more attention to student writing. Class size limited to 12.

Prerequisite: ENGL 141 or 142.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Fall

ENGL 242 —  Intermediate Fiction Workshop Course count: 1 

For students who have taken any introductory creative writing course. A more advanced course on the reading and writing of the short story with emphasis on refining the skills learned in the introductory course. Workshop format with lectures and readings. Class size limited to 12.

Prerequisite: ENGL 141 or 142

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 243 —  Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Workshop Course count: 1 

For students who have taken any introductory creative writing course. A more advanced course on the reading and writing of essays with emphasis on the structural composition of longer, more investigative pieces. Class size limited to 12.

Prerequisite: ENGL 141 or 142

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 312 —  Medieval Romance Course count: 1 

A study of the flowering of the Romance genre in late medieval England. Exploration of Continental and Middle Eastern origins; focus on popular subject matters of Romance in England, including Robin Hood and King Arthur.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 314 —  Chaucer Course count: 1 

A reading and critical discussion of the complete Middle English text of The Canterbury Tales and selected minor poems.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Annually

ENGL 315 —  Sex & Gender in Middle Ages Course count: 1 

An exploration of gender and sexuality in the Middle Ages in popular works of Arthurian romance, warrior epic, and saint's life, as well as in letters and trial records. The course also draws on classical, medieval and modern gender theory relevant to topics under discussion, such as virginity, homosexuality, chivalry, and romantic love.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 320 —  Age of Elizabeth Course count: 1 

A study of the golden age of English Renaissance literature. The course explores how imaginative texts helped create the Virgin Queen, courtly culture, the cosmopolitan city of London, the English nation, and the New World. Readings include works by Sidney, Shakespeare, Spenser, Donne, Harriot, Nashe, and Elizabeth Tudor herself.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 324 —  Milton Course count: 1 

A study of Milton's early poems, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes, and selections from the prose.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ENGL 325 —  Georgic and Pastoral Course count: 1 

As we continue to move into the twenty-first century, how will we ensure that everyone can enjoy nature in peaceful, safe, and healthy ways? This course aims to broaden students' understanding of the literary history informing these questions. "Georgic and Pastoral" asks students to consider poetry that explores the relationship between the human being and the natural world. As pastoral and georgic modes move through the late antique, medieval, early modern, and modern periods, they differ from one another in fairly consistent ways: pastoral poetry usually focuses on the lives of shepherds and rural deities living in a peaceful, natural space. Georgic poetry, on the other hand, takes up the subject of work, and tends to retain its didactic tone. Both modes, however, use these fundamental premises to engage with larger questions about human life and culture: who has the right to access land? Who has the right to evict someone else? What are the dangers of all-consuming love? What can the process of cultivation help us understand about creativity, humility, and perseverance?

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 329 —  Shakespeare Course count: 1 

A one-semester survey of the major works of Shakespeare, focusing on individual texts as representative of the stages in his dramatic development, with some discussion of Shakespearan stage techniques.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 330 —  Shakespeare & Religion Course count: 1 

An examination of theological and philosophical issues in Shakespeare's plays, with emphasis on tragedies. There will be additional readings from a number of sources, including the Bible, Luther, Montaigne, and major Shakespearean critics.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 336 —  18th-Century Novel Course count: 1 

A close examination of the novel as formal prose narrative. Novels by Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, Smollet, the Gothic novelists, Sterne, and Austen are considered in detail with collateral readings.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ENGL 337 —  18th-Century Poetry Course count: 1 

A study of the development of 18th-century English poetry from the canonical Augustans-Dryden, Pope, Swift, Anne Finch, and Lady Montagu-through the mid-century and later work of Gray, Collins, the Wartons, Smart, Cowper, Charlotte Smith, Joanna Baillie, and Anna Seward, ending with Blake's lyrics.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 338 —  18th-Century Satire Course count: 1 

The course will focus on a variety of 18th-century prose, dramatic, and verse satires, including works by Defoe, Swift, Pope, and others. Special attention will be given to modes of satire (burlesque, parody, travesty, mock epic, etc.) as well as to the objectives of satire (amendment, punishment).

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 339 —  Restoration & 18th-Century Drama Course count: 1 

A survey of English drama from Dryden to Sheridan, including heroic drama, Restoration comedy, sentimental developments of the 18th century, and the re-emergence of laughing comedy.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 344 —  The Romantic Revolution Course count: 1 

A study of the major writers of the Romantic movement -- Edmund Burke, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordswroth, Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Byron, Keats, Hazlitt, Lamb, and DeQuincey. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ENGL 345 —  British Women Writers 1770 - 1860 Course count: 1 

A study of novels, poetry, and prose writings by women writing during and after the Romantic Movement - Frances Burney, Jane Austen, the Brontes, Mary Wollstonecraft, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and others. One unit.

Enrollment limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students only

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 346 —  Victorian Poetry Course count: 1 

A study of the British poetry and poetic theory composed during Queen Victoria's reign (1837 - 1901). Authors treated may include Alfred Lord Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, D. G. Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, Matthew Arnold, and Gerard Manly Hopkins.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 347 —  19th-Century British Novel Course count: 1 

A close examination of the British novel in the 19th century, including novels by Thackeray, Dickens, the Brontes, George Eliot, and Hardy.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 348 —  Reality Hunger Course count: 1 

A study of the evolution of contemporary American non-fiction narrative, which traces its roots to the 19th-century writing of Emerson and Thoreau.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 350 —  Early American Colonialism Course count: 1 

A study of the development of cultural contact between Native Americans and Europeans, the Puritan experiment, and the founding of the nation from 1600 - 1830.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 351 —  Thoreau: Then and Now Course count: 1 

We will study Thoreau's works and their legacy today. The first half of the semester will focus on Thoreau's most influential texts from the more literary (his wonderful Journals, Walden, and Civil Disobedience), to the more scientific (Dispersion of Seeds and his land and river surveys). The second half of the course will explore how people use Thoreau's ideas today including the Tiny House movement, and the writings of Wendell Berry, Annie Dillard, Barbara Kingsolver, and more recent examples. To contrast Thoreau's own non-survivalist approach to nature, we will read Christopher MacCandless's experiment in Alaska as reported by Jon Krakauer in Into the Wild. To inscribe Thoreau more deeply in our own experience, we will make several field trips to Thoreau sites (up to 3 required, beyond that the trips are optional). We will read from Walden at Walden Pond, from his Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers while we canoe the Concord River, and perhaps hike Mt. Wachusett after reading Thoreau's A Walk to Wachusett.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 352 —  American Realism Course count: 1 

A study of the rise of variant expressions of realism, its evolution into naturalism, the revival of local color and the flowering of regionalism, all in response to the changing American scene through immigration, segregation, business, technology and other forces between the Civil War and World War I.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 353 —  American Women Write the World Course count: 1 

A study of various genres in which 19th-century women engaged restrictive definitions of a woman's sphere. Authors treated may include Davis, Child, Stowe, Alcott, Dickinson, Phelps, and Wharton.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 354 —  Lincoln, Civil War, & Memory Course count: 1 

A survey of how the Civil War and Reconstruction periods have been described in American literature, from both the northern and southern perspective. Possible works include selected Civil War poetry and speeches, Stephen Crane's Red Badge of Courage, Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind, and Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain.

Prerequisite: ENGL 251 or ENGL 293. ENGL 283 is recommended.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 355 —  Poe's Haunted Poetry Course count: 1 

This course examines Poe's contribution as editor and critic; as pioneer of short fiction and science fiction; as inventor of the detective story; as author of strange and powerful poems; and as master of horror. It surveys recurrent topics such as doubleness, death, and insoluble mystery in Poe's poems, essays, tales, and novel, within the broader context of 19th-century American culture.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 356 —  American Immigrant Narratives Course count: 1 

American Immigrant Narratives traces the development of the genre across the 20th century. While outlining and theorizing the tropes, settings, and expectations of this genre, we will keep an eye towards how particular authors make use of the genre to respond to or explore U.S. racial and social discourses concerning immigration in play at the time. We will focus on authors from various literary traditions, such as Mary Antin, Cristina García, and Gish Jen, while blending in work from popular culture, such as Mark Waid's Superman: Birthright, Lin Manuel-Miranda's Hamilton, and James Mangold's 2017 film Logan.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ENGL 357 —  The United States of Poetry Course count: 1 

A close analysis of the development of American poetry from the early 20th century up to the contemporary period, including such poets as Pound, Eliot, Williams, Crane, Frost, Stevens, Bishop, and others.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 358 —  Tales of American Experiences Course count: 1 

A study of the emergence of Modernism and other currents in the American novel from 1900 to the contemporary period.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 362 —  T.S. Eliot Course count: 1 

A close study of Eliot's poetry, criticism, and drama, including unpublished and lesser-known writings.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 363 —  Joyce Course count: 1 

A close study of Joyce's modernist epic novel Ulysses as an experimental narrative; preceded by a close reading of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man or Dubliners.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 364 —  Contemporary Irish Literature Course count: 1 

A study of the prose, poetry, and drama produced in Northern Ireland and the Republic from the last quarter of the 20th century to the present. Writers studied include Boland, Doyle, Friel, Heaney, and Ni Dhomhnaill as well as those less familiar to American readers, and readings are explored in light of relevant contemporary cultural concerns such as sectarianism, gender, the Celtic Tiger, and post-colonial identity.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 366 —  Modern British Novel Course count: 1 

A study of developments in the British novel from 1900 - 1950, with an emphasis on Modernist texts, through an examination of works by novelists such as Forster, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Rhys, Greene, and Waugh.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 367 —  Latinx Literature Course count: 1 

This class will consider a variety of Latino/a texts both for their narrative content and their historical context. The term "Latino" (often used interchangeably with "Hispanic") has come to connote a particular American experience for peoples descended from Spanish speaking countries and territories (and sometimes Brazil, depending on who you ask). As you can imagine, this makes the category itself quite broad, with its borders fuzzy and fluctuating. Focusing on work published in the last 50 years, we will examine how each author struggles with their own sense of cultural identity while locating themselves in a fraught U.S. racial landscape.  We will closely examine the narrative content of each text, as well as consider how the role of genre shapes each story. Furthermore, we will also consider the role of the specific national histories and their incumbent relationships to gender, race, class, religion, war, and diaspora for each individual text. In doing so, we will keep an eye out for how these texts overlap and diverge along these vectors, always considering what, exactly, is Latino/a literature.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ENGL 368 —  African-American Literature Course count: 1 

This course will examine works in the African-American literary tradition from its beginnings in antebellum poetry and the slave narrative, through the flourishing of the New Negro Movement, to the Black Arts Movement and its influence on the late twentieth century. These works struggle with declarations of personhood, the battle for equality, and most of all, the creation of an African-American voice. We will read a wide range of influential African-American texts in a variety of genres and situate them in their literary, historical, and/or political contexts.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Annually

ENGL 369 —  Modern Drama Course count: 1 

A study of developments in drama from 1890 to 1960 in England, America, and on the Continent through an examination of selected works of such playwrights as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Pirandello, O'Neill, Brecht, Williams, and Beckett.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 372 —  Contemporary African-American Literature and Culture Course count: 1 

An investigation of literature by African-American authors dating from the 1970's to the present day in the genres of science fiction/fantasy, mystery, memoir, novels exploring gender and sexuality, and cultural theory, with emphasis on the issues of visibility and invisibility as well as the theme of the American Dream. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ENGL 375 —  Asian-American Literature Course count: 1 

A survey of representative Asian-American literature from early twentieth-century immigrant narratives to contemporary writings. Examines Asian American literary production and its main literary themes.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 377 —  Environmental Poetics Course count: 1 

Rather than provide a survey of environmental literature, this course will explore how various literary texts imagine a relation (or non-relation) between the human being and the non-human world. We will consider works from multiple genres and time periods alongside longstanding and recent theoretical approaches to the question of nature. How do imaginative writers represent the place of the human being in the larger, "natural" world? Do their texts have an ethical or political valence? What kind of local and global environments do they represent, or attempt to bring into being? What place does human labor, or human indolence, have in shaping the world? What role does the animal take in human imagining? Assignments are designed to help students frame these and other questions for themselves while attending closely to questions of literary form.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 378 —  21st-Century Literature Course count: 1 

Explores award-winning British and American literature of the new millennium in an attempt to take the pulse of what's going on in our most contemporary literature. Texts are read in the contexts of late 20th-century literary and theoretical movements such as: postmodernism, post-colonialism, gender studies, and multiculturalism.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 379 —  Confrontations with Christianity Course count: 1 

Course explores a variety of American ethnic authors' engagement with religion in the context of racial strife, uplift, and hierarchy in the United States. As we shall see, many of these authors will be drawn to the power of Christianity for a variety of reasons, not all of them spiritual. Some will seek the potential for cross-ethnic communities brought together by mutual circumstance as a strategy for assimilating into the larger body politic, or simply as a way to sculpt their own racial identities. Still others confront Christianity as a way to confront a U.S. racialized society as a whole and critique their place within it. There will be, of course, even other fraught relationships between the individual, Christianity, and related hegemonic forces. Our task will be to examine these confrontations and how they intersect with related issues concerning sexuality, gender, class, revolution, and many others. The questions we will consistently pursue throughout the class will address what value these authors find in Christianity and what cultural adversities challenge their faith, as well as what these narratives offer us as a community of faith.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 381 —  Rhetoric Course count: 1 

A consideration of rhetorical theory in the classical texts of Plato and Aristotle, an analysis of some famous examples of persuasive eloquence, and the student's own exercise of persuasive speech on subjects of public concern.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

ENGL 382 —  Queer Theory Course count: 1 

Built upon but departing from the identity-based approach of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) Studies, Queer Theory critically investigates cultural normativities related to sexuality, sex, and gender. This highly theoretical course will introduce students to the foundational thinkers of the field, including Foucault, Sedgwick, and Butler. We will also consider literary works that enact queer theory.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 383 —  Feminist Literary Theory Course count: 1 

An examination of major directions in 20th-century feminist literary theory, with study of works by writers such as Charlotte Bronte, Chopin, Gilman, Woolf, Atwood, and Morrison. Theory may address such issues as gendered reading and writing, representation of the body and sexuality, gender/race/class, feminism and ideology.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 387 —  Composition Theory & Pedagogy Course count: 1 

An investigation of how people learn to write, and how they can be helped to write better. Topics include individual composing processes, academic discourse constraints, and cultural influences on writing. This by-permission course is required for all students who wish to become peer tutors in the Holy Cross Writer's Workshop.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Fall

ENGL 388 —  Advanced Workshop Course count: 1 

An advanced multi-genre workshop. Only those who have completed at least one introductory-level and one intermediate-level creative writing course will be considered. Specialization in one genre and completion of the creative writing concentration are both recommended. Permission of the instructor required.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 391 —  Topics in Rhetoric Course count: 1 

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

ENGL 392 —  Topics in Composition Course count: 1 

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 393 —  Toni Morrison Course count: 1 

This course examines the trajectories of Toni Morrison's literary career, including books from her early, middle and late stages, as well as some of her own literary and cultural criticism. This course is an opportunity to engage in depth with a single author and to gain a deeper understanding of Morrison's style, form, and representations of American communities and histories.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ENGL 400 —  Tutorial Course count: 1 

Permission of the instructor and/or the department chair ordinarily required for such courses. One unit.

GPA units: 1

ENGL 401 —  Seminar Course count: 1 

Advanced seminars offer students an opportunity to pursue an ambitious independent project and to take more responsibility for class experience. Recent seminars have included: Tolkien, Dickens, Catholicism in Irish Literature, Transgender Memoir, American Historical Romance, Global Modernism, Graphic Novel, Jane Austen, Shakespeare's Christian Humanism, and Medieval Otherworlds. One unit each semester.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 407 —  English Honors Thesis Course count: 1 

Two semesters' credit, granted at end of second semester. Candidates selected from invited applicants to the English Honors Committee.

GPA units: 0

Typically Offered: Fall

ENGL 408 —  English Honors Thesis Course count: 1 

Two semesters' credit, granted at end of second semester. Candidates selected from invited applicants to the English Honors Committee. One unit each semester.

GPA units: 2

Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 409 —  English Honors Colloquium Course count: 0 

English Honors thesis students and College Honors English thesis students. One-half credit, granted at end of second semester.

GPA units: 0.5