Asian Studies (ASTD)

ANTH 170 —  Contemporary Asia Course count: 1 

This course examines contemporary Asia as an interconnected region that influences world events and as diverse societies, cultures, and nation states that face particular problems as they struggle with issues of globalization, modernity, and neoliberalism while trying to maintain a sense of national or cultural identity. Readings focus on India, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Japan, China, Hong Kong, Philippines, and the Asian diaspora. Topics include religion, aging, family, gender, politics, economics, class, labor migration, consumerism, ethnicity, and Orientalism.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ANTH 269 —  Fashion & Consumption Course count: 1 

A comparative, cultural anthropological exploration of fashion and consumption as tools for the creation, expression, and contestation of social, cultural, economic, political and individual identities. Topics include: anthropological and semiotic theories of materialism and consumption, subcultural styles, colonialism, race, gender, religious dress, globalization and ethnic chic.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

ANTH 274 —  Art and Power in Asia Course count: 1 

How does art interrelate to political power and to wealth? This course examines such questions in regard to the art of ancient kingdoms in Asia such as Cambodia's Angkor Wat and Indonesia's Borobudur. Also at issue are the contemporary arts of Southeast Asia, seen too through this anthropology of art lens. Additionally, this course looks at the power dynamics of international art collecting of Asian art and artifacts; the politics and aesthetics of putting Asian art into worldwide museums is also studied. Includes museum study tours.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

ASTD 110 —  Asian American Studies Course count: 1 

This course explores Asian American experiences and histories from 1776 to the present with a special emphasis on labor, war, and activism. We will explore how Asian laborers have been racialized in relation to other groups in the United States and its territories; how American wars in the Pacific influence both the demographic make-up and critical outlook of Asian America; and how different Asian American groups have organized in response to U.S. racism and imperialism. Rather than take Asian America as a given, we will probe the contours of who is considered a part of Asian American history, challenging the field to acknowledge under-represented groups such as Pacific Islanders, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Arab Americans. We will explore how questions of race and ethnicity intersect with those of class, gender, and sexuality. This course utilizes an interdisciplinary approach, combining archival analyses with theory, poetry, memoir, and film.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Annually

ASTD 494 —  Directed Research Course count: 1 

Students may undertake independent research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Individuals contemplating a research project should make inquiries during their third year, since the project is usually initiated by the beginning of the fourth year.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ASTD 495 —  Directed Research Course count: 1 

Students may undertake independent research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Individuals contemplating a research project should make inquiries during their third year, since the project is usually initiated by the beginning of the fourth year.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHIN 101 —  Elementary Chinese 1 Course count: 1 

An introduction to spoken Mandarin and written Chinese. Providing a foundation in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and communication skills and an introduction to the Chinese culture.

Students who have taken any higher level CHIN course may not register for CHIN 101. No previous knowledge of language.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

CHIN 102 —  Elementary Chinese 2 Course count: 1 

An introduction to spoken Mandarin and written Chinese. Providing a foundation in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and communication skills and an introduction to the Chinese culture.

Recommended prerequisite: CHIN 101 or equivalent. Students who have taken any higher level CHIN course may not register for CHIN 102.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

CHIN 103 —  Introduction to Chinese Culture Course count: 1 

An introduction to the history, geography, literature, and social issues of China through readings, films, music, poetry, and web-based resources. Taught in English. Three class hours weekly. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

CHIN 201 —  Intermediate Chinese 1 Course count: 1 

Continued focus on the development of oral and written communication skills and on the strengthening of cultural competency in Chinese through the use of written texts and multimedia resources. Five class hours weekly. One and one-quarter units each semester.

Recommended prerequisite: CHIN 102 or equivalent. Students who have taken any higher level CHIN course may not register for CHIN 201.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

CHIN 202 —  Intermediate Chinese 2 Course count: 1 

Continued focus on the development of oral and written communication skills and on the strengthening of cultural competency in Chinese through the use of written texts and multimedia resources. Five class hours weekly. One and one-quarter units each semester.

Recommended prerequisite: CHIN 201 or equivalent. Students who have taken any higher level CHIN course may not register for CHIN 202.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

CHIN 250 —  Traditional Chinese Literature Course count: 1 

Introduction to major works in traditional Chinese literature. One Unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

CHIN 251 —  China and the Environment Course count: 1 

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

CHIN 255 —  Chin Cult Through Camera's Eye Course count: 1 

An exploration of Chinese culture through 20th- and 21st-century Chinese cinema. Taught in English. One unit.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

CHIN 260 —  Chinese Linguistics Course count: 1 

An overview of the history and structure of the Chinese language. One Unit.

Prerequisite: CHIN 102 or permission from instructor.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

CHIN 301 —  Third Year Chinese 1 Course count: 1 

Continued focus on the development of oral and written communication skills and cultural competency through the use of traditional Chinese readings and multimedia resources. Five class hours weekly. One and one-quarter units each semester.

Prerequisite: CHIN 202 or permission of the instructor. Students who have taken any higher level CHIN course may not enroll in CHIN 301

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

CHIN 302 —  Third Year Chinese 2 Course count: 1 

Continued focus on the development of oral and written communication skills and cultural competency through the use of traditional Chinese readings and multimedia resources. Five class hours weekly. One and one-quarter units each semester.

Prerequisite: CHIN 301.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

CHIN 392 —  Tutorial Course count: 1 

GPA units: 1

CHIN 401 —  Fourth Year Chinese 1 Course count: 1 

Continued development of oral and written communication skills and cultural competency through the use of readings, videos, and other multimedia resources. One unit each semester.

Prerequisite: CHIN 302 or Study Abroad in China, or permission of the instructor.

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

CHIN 402 —  Fourth Year Chinese 2 Course count: 1 

Continued development of oral and written communication skills and cultural competency through the use of readings, videos, and other multimedia resources. One unit each semester.

Prerequisite: CHIN 401 or Study Abroad in China

GPA units: 1.25

Common Area: Language Studies

CHIN 409 —  Introduction to Literary Chinese 1 Course count: 1 

An introduction to the classical literary language of China. One unit each semester.

Prerequisite: CHIN 202 or permission from instructor.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Language Studies

CHIN 491 —  Tutorial Course count: 1 

GPA units: 1

CHIN 492 —  Tutorial Course count: 1 

GPA units: 1

CLAS 188 —  Alexander the Great and Asia Course count: 1 

Considers the political, religious, and cultural encounters between the ancient Greek world and Asia generated by the expedition of Alexander the Great and the long-term development stemming from those encounters.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Historical Studies, Literature

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ECON 221 —  Econ Development Modern China Course count: 1 

Aims to provide the student with a sophisticated understanding of economic development in China. The historical circumstances and resource endowments which have constrained Chinese economic development are examined as a basis for analyzing the intentions and success of policies adopted since 1949.

Prerequisite: ECON 110, ECON 111, or ECON 112.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ECON 309 —  Comparative Economic Systems Course count: 1 

First segment develops an analytical framework for the comparison of economic systems. Second segment uses this framework to examine and compare the economic systems of various countries including the United States, Germany, France, Japan, China, the former Soviet Union and other East European states.

Prerequisite: ECON 255 and ECON 256

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ENGL 356 —  American Immigrant Narratives Course count: 1 

American Immigrant Narratives traces the development of the genre across the 20th century. While outlining and theorizing the tropes, settings, and expectations of this genre, we will keep an eye towards how particular authors make use of the genre to respond to or explore U.S. racial and social discourses concerning immigration in play at the time. We will focus on authors from various literary traditions, such as Mary Antin, Cristina García, and Gish Jen, while blending in work from popular culture, such as Mark Waid's Superman: Birthright, Lin Manuel-Miranda's Hamilton, and James Mangold's 2017 film Logan.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Literature

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

ENGL 375 —  Asian-American Literature Course count: 1 

A survey of representative Asian-American literature from early twentieth-century immigrant narratives to contemporary writings. Examines Asian American literary production and its main literary themes.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Literature

Typically Offered: Every Third Year

HIST 105 —  Asia in Western Fiction and Film Course count: 1 

Examines and compares descriptions of Asia and portrayals of Asian societies found in Western novels, short stories and films produced since the mid-19th century, and relates them to colonial and post-colonial historical encounters between Asia and the West. Fulfills non-Western requirement for the major. One unit.

4th year HIST majors are not eligible to enroll in this course.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

HIST 280 —  Modern India Course count: 1 

This course takes us on an intellectual journey through Indias past and present. The course begins with important vignettes of Indian society, culture, and politics prior to the arrival of the British. We will examine how and why various facets of Indian society, namely: economic, legal, religious, and gender relations underwent radical transformation during the British rule. In the second segment of the course, we will study the causes and consequences of the Indian struggle for Independence that ended the British rule, but also led to a violent partition of India in 1947. The third segment of the course will look at some key individuals who sought to implement differing visions of India in the post-colonial era. By following the stories of the historical actors, events, and ideas we will seek to understand how colonial legacy, caste and gender relations, political corruption, and religious fundamentalism have shaped the contemporary Indian society.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

HIST 281 —  Imperial China Course count: 1 

Surveys Chinese political history from the formative era of the imperial system in the fourth century B.C. through the Communist revolution in 1949. Themes demonstrate how the tradition has shaped and is reconstructed to suit contemporary forces in China. Films, biographies, historical and philosophical writings, and western interpretations of events and personalities offer a variety of perspectives. Fulfills non-Western requirement and one pre-modern/pre-industrial requirement for the major.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 282 —  Modern China Course count: 1 

Introduction to events, personalities, and concepts of particular significance for understanding Chinas development from a traditional empire considered so weak that it was called the sick man of Asia to a modern state that will continue to play a major role in a global world. Covers the period from the Opium Wars in the mid-nineteenth century through the post-Maoist reforms using a variety of sources, including documents, film, literature, reportage and memoirs. Topics covered include ongoing debates within China itself about the often competing demands of modernization, nationalism, traditionalism, feminism, social justice, economic imperatives, rule of law, and human rights.

Enrollment limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students only

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

HIST 286 —  Modern Japan Course count: 1 

This course begins by surveying political, social, economic and cultural developments during the so-called ¿early modern¿ period of Japanese history (1600-1850), when the country was governed by the samurai military class. The focus then shifts to the period between the 1850 and 1930, when Japan undertook a thoroughgoing ¿modern¿ revolution that transformed it into a major military, industrial and colonial power that rivaled Europe and the United States. While modernization resolved some of the challenges facing the country in the 19th-century, it also posed a new set of challenges for Japanese -that culminated in the Pacific War.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

MUSC 231 —  Music Of Bali-Gamelan 1 Course count: 1 

Introduces students to Balinese music through the performance of selected pieces from the Gong Kebyar repertory. Instruction provided in the technique of playing the instruments that make up the Gamelan.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Arts, Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MUSC 232 —  Music Of Bali-Gamelan 2 Course count: 1 

Introduces students to more advanced techniques of playing the instruments in the Gamelan.

Prerequisite: MUSC 231

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Arts, Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MUSC 233 —  World Music Course count: 1 

Introduction to music of selected African, Asian, and American cultures. Each culture is approached through its social and cultural context, its theoretical systems and musical instruments, as well as its major musical and theatrical genres.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Arts, Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Annually

PHIL 255 —  Asian Philosophy Course count: 1 

What is the ultimate goal of human existence, if any? Are there qualities of persons or actions that promote harmony with the community or with nature at large? Is there a soul that exists beyond this life? Is there really a self at all? Is there a permanent reality beneath the visible world of changeor is the motley of change all there is to the world? We shall explore these fundamental philosophical questions through key Asian traditions of wisdom such as Confucianism, Daoism, Hinduism and Buddhism. Not only is an understanding of these wisdom traditions valuable in themselves, itll also help us understand better the Asian nations which social, political, ethical and cultural practices are founded on Asian philosophy.

Enrollment limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students only

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Philosophical Studies

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

PHIL 361 —  Confucian Values & Human Rights Course count: 1 

Discourse about Confucian values, frequently known as "Asian Values," provided strong resistance to Western rights. Arguing that human rights are not universal because of their origin in the West, Asian nations urge that consideration be given to their cultural and historical situations which justify their own brand of human rights. Confucian values are being invoked by the Chinese government in political discussions with the U.S. This seminar focuses on primary texts by Confucius, Mencius and two other early Confucian texts, in order to understand the philosophical concepts which constitute Confucian values. We will survey some contemporary literatures on human rights to come to an understanding of the highly contested concept of human rights. Ultimately, we examine what values are Confucian, whether they are compatible with human rights, (especially the first- and second-generation rights), and if one of these is prior to the other for Confucianism. We ask if there are resources within Confucian values which can contribute to a better understanding of human rights.

Prerequisite: One previous Philosophy course. Enrollment is limited to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies

POLS 274 —  China from Mao to Market Course count: 1 

Explores the history of modern China from the Opium Wars of the 1840s to the present. Two central themes are the tension between reform and revolution as alternative paths for the modernization of China and whether, in order to emerge as a great power, China should embrace or reject Western models and values. This course focuses on the following questions: (1) the rise of the Communist Party and the reasons for its victory over the Nationalists; (2) Maos ideological campaigns of the 1950s and 1960s, culminating in the Cultural Revolution; (3) the dynamics and dilemmas of post-Mao economic and political reform; (4) the 1989 Democracy Movement and the prospects for democratization in present-day China. Comparative Politics.

Prerequisite: POLS 102

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Historical Studies

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 275 —  Internat'l Political Economy Course count: 1 

This course is designed to be an introduction to international political economy. Provides an overview of theories of international political economy, a historical review of the international political economy in light of these theories, and an application of the theoretical approaches to issues of trade, monetary relations, finance, and development. Readings and discussion focus on issues of conflict and cooperation; the relationship between the international system and domestic politics; economic growth, development, and equity; and the connections between the study of economics and politics. International Relations.

Prerequisite: POLS 103 or International Studies major.

GPA units: 1

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 276 —  South Asian Politics Course count: 1 

Prerequisite: POLS 102 or POLS 103

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

POLS 278 —  East Asia in World Politics Course count: 1 

This course examines China's emergence as a major power, and surveys the relationships of East Asian states with each other and with external powers including the United States. In addition to China, substantial attention is given to Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. Topics covered include military competition and regional security, trade relations, globalization, human rights, and potential conflict flashpoints such as North Korea and Taiwan. International Relations.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Social Science

Typically Offered: Annually

RELS 106 —  Buddhism Course count: 1 

Survey of the Buddhist tradition, from its origins in ancient India through its evolution as a pan-Asian faith. Topics include the legends of the Buddha, the early monastic community, the emergence of Theravada and Mahayana teachings, Buddhist ethics and social philosophy, meditation traditions, and the later development of distinctive Tibetan, Chinese, and Japanese schools. Utilizes textual and anthropological sources.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RELS 120 —  Comparative Religions/World View Course count: 1 

Systematic exploration of similarities and differences within and among several traditions (Hinduism, Christianity, and Islam) and an examination of several key issues within the academic study of religion.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Spring

RELS 165 —  Ancient and Medieval Hinduism Course count: 1 

Introduction to key themes in ancient and medieval Hinduism. Considers the sacrificial worldview of the Vedas and Brahmanas and then moves to discuss the significance of the Upanishads and yoga. Special attention will be given to the two chief Hindu epics: the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. Also examines key elements in Hindu law through a reading of The Laws of Manu. Concludes with a consideration of Hindu devotional theism in the worship Shiva, Krishna, and the goddess Kali.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Spring

RELS 216 —  Readings: Asian Sacred Texts Course count: 1 

Focuses on critical and analytical readings of sacred writings in translation from the Asian religious traditions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daosim. The genres sampled include law codes, works of ascetic mysticism, religious biography, popular narrative, and scholastic treatises. Also examines the cross-cultural definition of "text," the idea of a "scriptural canon," and the construction of tradition in the western historical imagination.

Prerequisite: One previous course in Asian Religions

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

RELS 255 —  Ecology & Religion Course count: 1 

Explores various perspectives on nature articulated in the history of the world¿s religions beginning with hunter-gatherer and tribal peoples. Distinctive doctrines derived from sacred texts and by philosophers/ theologians, as well as the impact of ritual practices, are reviewed to understand the impact of religion on human ecology. After considering the perspective of Enlightenment thought on the natural world, the course surveys early North American exponents of ecological spirituality (Thoreau; Emerson; Muir), the writings of Eco-theologians (Fox; Berry; Schweitzer; McFague), and how cosmologies articulated by modern ecologists (Leopold; Lovelock) and activists (Earth First! And Greenpeace) have sought to define as sacred the human connection with the natural world.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

RELS 260 —  Comparative Mysticism & Human Ecology Course count: 1 

A phenomenological analysis of mystical experience, both theory and practice, and an investigation of the epistemological and ontological status of this experience. Approach is pluralistic considering mysticism from the following perspectives: psychological, religious, anthropological, philosophical and scientific. Examines various conceptions of ultimate reality and a variety of practices constituting the mystic path or way. Mystical experience is broadly conceived as a state of consciousness whose dominant symbols and structures of thought, behavior and expression relate to the ultimate transformation of self and world.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Fall

RELS 311 —  Zen Buddhism Course count: 1 

Examination of Zen Buddhism and its influences on East Asian civilizations. Surveys the texts and monastic practices that define Zen spiritual cultivation and the history of the Soto and Rinzai schools¿ evolution. Special attention is also devoted to the distinctive poetic (haiku), fine arts (painting, gardening, tea ceremony)) and martial arts (swordsmanship) disciplines that this tradition has inspired in China and Japan.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Spring

RELS 312 —  Theravada Buddhism Course count: 1 

Seminar examining the prominent texts, doctrines and practices of the Theravada Buddhist tradition. Surveys the historical development of the tradition in India, with attention to major schools of interpretation and practice. Theravada social philosophy and ethics are studied, as are the patterns of accommodation with non-Buddhist religions. The second half of the course focuses upon the distinctive practices of Burma, Sri Lanka, and Thailand as well as reformist modern movements.

Prerequisite: RELS 206 or permission of instructor.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

RELS 340 —  Gardens & World Religions Course count: 1 

A survey of the historical and cultural backgrounds of the major garden traditions of the world associated with religions. This course moves from considerations of human aesthetic and spiritual experience in the natural world to a survey of the major garden traditions associated with the western Mediterranean and Europe: in classical Greece and Rome, Christianity, and Islam. The course then moves to East Asia and classical traditions of China and Japan. Special focus will be given to elements of the campus Japanese Garden Initiative: teahouse gardens and monastic viewing gardens. Field trips to regional gardens will be made. For the final project, students design small virtual contemplative gardens for possible construction at specific campus sites.

Prerequisite: One previous course in Religion, Asian Studies or Middle East Studies

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Cross-Cultural Studies, Studies in Religion

Typically Offered: Alternate Years

THEA 131 —  Balinese Dance 1 - 2 Course count: 1 

Balinese Dance is a dance performance class which surveys the rich classical, contemporary, and folk traditions of music, mask, dance, and theatre from Bali, Indonesia. Hinduism plays a significant role in the performing arts of Bali and will be discussed in relationship to performance. Students rehearse and perform with Gamelan Gita Sari, the Holy Cross gamelan orchestra. This course can be taken for two semesters.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Arts, Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

THEA 232 —  Balinese Dance 3 - 4 Course count: 1 

Advanced Balinese Dance builds on the background and techniques covered in Balinese Dance 1-2. Students delve more deeply into the traditions of Bali and perform more advanced repertoire in a concert setting. Students may take this course for two semesters with the permission of the instructor, progressing to advanced repertoire of both traditional and contemporary Balinese dances, including solos.

GPA units: 1

Common Area: Arts, Cross-Cultural Studies

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring